Tag Archive | Halsbury’s Law Monthly

Insure Indian Lawyers Against Clients’ Claims : New Law Mag – By Mukesh Jhangiani

                                                                                                                      September 26, 2007

Insure Indian Lawyers Against Clients’ Claims: New Law Mag

By Mukesh Jhangiani
United News of India

New Delhi (UNI) – Professional negligence insurance for lawyers and other such issues are highlighted in a new legal magazine, Halsbury’s Law Monthly, unveiled by Chief Justice of India K G Balakrishnan last evening.

When an advocate fails to provide competent services to his or her client (Photo: ethics-lawyer.com)

Insurance is intended to discourage practices and ways that hurt clients’ interests without much of a hope for them to recover losses, unless they have the stomach for protracted litigation– against their lawyer.

A Monthly piece stresses making professional negligence insurance mandatory in India, pointing out that it will make lawyers more vigilant and protect the clients’ interests.

Such measure can insure lawyers against claims for damages from clients who think the service received was not worth the fee given.

Speaking after unveiling a large-sized display of the magazine cover, Justice Balakrishnan spoke highly of the authoritative and reliable output of LexisNexis group which includes Butterworths, one of the largest legal publishers with over 180 years of history.

He said the publications were known for bringing out material which was a good source of reference professionals would like to possess and hoped the new magazine would live up to the publisher’s reputation.

”I hope the Monthly will maintain the high standards of Halsbury’s,” Justice Balakrishnan said.

LexisNexis’s Asia managing director John Atkinson told participants that the new venture would focus on such up and coming areas as outsourcing, retail, corporate and cyber laws and intellectual property.

The new publication is the publisher’s first in collaboration with Cybermedia, which already puts out nearly a dozen magazines.

LexisNexis also publish Halsbury’s Laws, The Malayan Law Journal, Mallal’s Digest, Laws of Malaysia, Hong Kong Cases and CaseBase.

Aalok Wadhwa, its managing director for India, said the magazine would orient readers to the growing potential of the corporate legal world in the current socio-economic environment.

In remarks afterwards, Atkinson told UNI that the group’s publications and efforts aim at promoting transparency and efficiency in legal affairs.

He cited how LexisNexis has implemented electronic-filing and electronic-service projects in some parts of the world, such as Colorado and Delaware.

”And it works. We’d certainly like to offer it in India.” Such efforts benefit not just courts, but also law firms by giving them prompt access to data, he said.

Asked whether the Monthly will focus on problems of access to justice or of corruption, Atkinson said initially the magazine expected to focus on such areas as the corporate law, which is a growing entity.

As for what he dubbed ”underlying problems,” he said the magazine has an editorial Board, mostly made up of lawyers, which will take such decisions.

Asked how the Butterworths have been roping in Judges to write for them, Atkinson said it was done as anywhere in the world, by first identifying a subject and then finding out who has the specific experience in that field of law and ask them.

A book assignment usually takes a couple of years to complete, and writers are only paid royalty from sales, he said.

UNI MJ

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Spread Word About Legal Aid – Apex Court Judge – By Mukesh Jhangiani

                                                                                                     October 19, 2008

Spread Word About Legal Aid – Apex Court Judge*

By Mukesh Jhangiani
United News of India

New Delhi (UNI) – Hoping to serve ”global legal community’s interest in India more effectively,” a New Delhi-based law publisher has been reminded of tasks at home– spreading word about legal aid, for one.

The suggestion from Supreme Court Judge Altamas Kabir came at a function this week celebrating the 4-month-old merger of Britain’s LexisNexis Butterworths with Indian law book publisher Wadhwa Nagpur.

A lot of people in India are not aware of the existence of legal aid cells in the country, said Justice Kabir, citing an instance of information people ought to have.
He said with the development of information technology industry and globalisation of laws, the legal and judicial fraternity in India frequently refer to legal developments and literature from abroad.
Justice Kabir touched on changes with which the Indian legal system must cope– and the consequent demands they pose, voicing hope that the company’s content suite will aid in the process.
The event was attended among others by Law Commission of India Chairman A R Lakshmanan, Delhi High Court Chief Justice A P Shah and Senior Advocate K K Venugopal.
India has some 14,000 judicial officers presiding in courts and almost a million lawyers enrolled with the nation’s statutory Bar Councils.
Dr Justice Lakshmanan hailed the merger, saying the new entity would provide the best local and global content to Indian legal industry.
Justice Shah emphasised the need for easy access to information from various sources for providing litigants speedy justice given the rapidly growing volume of cases as well as arrears.
Noting the importance Indian courts give precedents, Justice Shah said systematic and comprehensive online databases and efficient law reporting would help lawyers and the judiciary serve people better.
Venugopal said a comprehensive database as a ‘readyreckoner’ was imperative for Indian lawyers and law students– given the value of knowledge and the high costs of journals or classics.
He suggested that the publishers focus on producing quality legal journals that can generate discussions on Indian laws, judiciary and the legal system.
The event marked the launch of DD Basu’s Shorter Constitution of India by Justice Kabir, first anniversary issue of Halsbury’s Law Monthly by Justice Shah and an Online LexisNexis Bookstore by Dr Justice Lakshmanan.
LexisNexis Group’s New York-based Senior Vice President Robert Rigby-Hall– the new company’s Managing Director– promised ”richer, more comprehensive solutions to the Indian legal industry.”
These, he said, would include integrated content from key markets such as the United States, Britain and Australia and could play a crucial role in such reforms as digitisation of courts and bringing efficiency into the Indian legal profession.
A statement by the Wadhwa Brothers of Wadhwa Nagpur said ”The merger will add significant value to the Indian legal market and enable us to serve the global legal community’s interest in India more effectively.
”With increased global demand for Indian legal content, and emergence of the Legal Process Outsourcing industry, it is an exciting opportunity to make Wadhwa Nagpur content available to the worldwide marketplace,” it said.
UNI MJ RP BD1520

Insure Indian Lawyers Against Clients’ Claims : New Law Mag – By Mukesh Jhangiani

                                                                                                                                           September 26, 2007

Insure Indian Lawyers Against Clients’ Claims: New Law Mag

By Mukesh Jhangiani
United News of India

New Delhi (UNI) – Professional negligence insurance for lawyers and other such issues are highlighted in a new legal magazine, Halsbury’s Law Monthly, unveiled by Chief Justice of India K G Balakrishnan last evening.

When an advocate fails to provide competent services to his or her client (Photo: ethics-lawyer.com)

Insurance is intended to discourage practices and ways that hurt clients’ interests without much of a hope for them to recover losses, unless they have the stomach for protracted litigation– against their lawyer.

A Monthly piece stresses making professional negligence insurance mandatory in India, pointing out that it will make lawyers more vigilant and protect the clients’ interests.

Such measure can insure lawyers against claims for damages from clients who think the service received was not worth the fee given.

Speaking after unveiling a large-sized display of the magazine cover, Justice Balakrishnan spoke highly of the authoritative and reliable output of LexisNexis group which includes Butterworths, one of the largest legal publishers with over 180 years of history.

He said the publications were known for bringing out material which was a good source of reference professionals would like to possess and hoped the new magazine would live up to the publisher’s reputation.

”I hope the Monthly will maintain the high standards of Halsbury’s,” Justice Balakrishnan said.

LexisNexis’s Asia managing director John Atkinson told participants that the new venture would focus on such up and coming areas as outsourcing, retail, corporate and cyber laws and intellectual property.

The new publication is the publisher’s first in collaboration with Cybermedia, which already puts out nearly a dozen magazines.

LexisNexis also publish Halsbury’s Laws, The Malayan Law Journal, Mallal’s Digest, Laws of Malaysia, Hong Kong Cases and CaseBase.

Aalok Wadhwa, its managing director for India, said the magazine would orient readers to the growing potential of the corporate legal world in the current socio-economic environment.

In remarks afterwards, Atkinson told UNI that the group’s publications and efforts aim at promoting transparency and efficiency in legal affairs.

He cited how LexisNexis has implemented electronic-filing and electronic-service projects in some parts of the world, such as Colorado and Delaware.

”And it works. We’d certainly like to offer it in India.” Such efforts benefit not just courts, but also law firms by giving them prompt access to data, he said.

Asked whether the Monthly will focus on problems of access to justice or of corruption, Atkinson said initially the magazine expected to focus on such areas as the corporate law, which is a growing entity.

As for what he dubbed ”underlying problems,” he said the magazine has an editorial Board, mostly made up of lawyers, which will take such decisions.

Asked how the Butterworths have been roping in Judges to write for them, Atkinson said it was done as anywhere in the world, by first identifying a subject and then finding out who has the specific experience in that field of law and ask them.

A book assignment usually takes a couple of years to complete, and writers are only paid royalty from sales, he said.

UNI MJ