Tag Archive | Multinational

Eliminate Mismanagement To Raise Bottomline: Security Gurus – By Mukesh Jhangiani

                                                                                                          September 10, 2006

Ramalinga Raju, Founder and Chairman, Satyam C...

Satyam Computer Services founder & ex-chairman B Ramalinga Raju (Photo: Wikipedia)

Eliminate Mismanagement To Raise Bottomline: Security Gurus

By Mukesh Jhangiani
United News of India

New Delhi (UNI) – Posting guards at gates is no longer sufficient security– businesses must be protected from within, two award-winning Indian security professionals say.

Wrong managers, wrong human resource policies and neglect of fire, pilferage and other risks were among factors cited by Kunwar Vikram Singh and Ravinder Kishore Sinha as causes of losses companies incur.
Singh and fellow security professionals assembled this week to felicitate Sinha, who was honoured last month by Security Association of Singapore for having promoted ”globally” the concept of ‘Total Loss Control’.
A few days ago, Singh was reported to have been honoured by the World Association of Detectives at Tokyo, Japan for having caught in New Delhi a man wanted by Interpol for a multi-million dollar fraud in Singapore. He is president of a Central Association of Private Security Industry.
Sinha, the executive chairman of an International Institute of Security and Safety Management, acknowledged that the TLC concept drew on an old wisdom: A penny saved is a penny earned.
He recalled how the Steel Authority of India once turned down a Rupees five crore security package proposed by an executive because it did not want to reduce the bottom line.
But SAIL changed its mind once it was explained how the expense would pay for itself many times over and add to the bottom line through savings.
In India, security affairs are still largely identified with the notion of ‘chowkidari,’ Sinha said, adding that it involved in fact a lot more.
Sinha remarked that managements have hitherto been skeptical about such measures, but new laws in the air are changing that.
They include Private Security Agencies (Regulation) Act 2005 and a Bill in the works to regulate private investigation industry.
He said securitymen were traditionally hired to guard businesses against outsider threats– whereas threats lurk within. ”Sources of losses are sitting well within an organisation.”
He pointed to the enormous risks that companies run, for instance, not taking care of fire hazards — as three per cent of India’s Gross Domestic Product goes up in smoke every year.
He said businesses– even the best of business schools– often define profit as total revenue minus total expenditure, but overlook ”unnecessary costs, elimination of which adds to the bottom line or profit.”
Singh cited a multinational he did not name, some of whose senior officials hired unqualified kin and engaged in other questionable practices. ”Once we made our report, the needful was done.”
Sinha and Singh said besides mismanagement and corrupt practices, such costs arise from inadequate security and safety, workplace waste, drug abuse, and can be cut down by taking preventive and reactive steps involving investigation and intelligence work.
In reply to questions, Sinha said corruption at various levels was a growing threat, but it could only be countered when the top management took interest.
Asked if employees seeking to legally oppose such goings-on could hire their services, Sinha replied: ”We assist anyone with a legitimate stake, and employees are stakeholders.”
Sinha said the idea was to identify all kinds of sources of losses and ”develop an integrated counter-measure.”
Sinha said every organisation had essentially two kinds of energies or forces at work– positive and negative. The latter must be checked to turn things around.
UNI MJ AB KP1109

 Related articles

Advertisements

Vedanta Workers’ Wage Struggle ‘Not Entertainable’ : NHRC – By Mukesh Jhangiani

English: NHRC logo

NHRC (Photo: Wikipedia)

                                                                                                           November 21, 2010

Vedanta Workers’ Wage Struggle ‘Not Entertainable’ – NHRC

By Mukesh Jhangiani
United News of India

New Delhi (UNI) – India’s National Human Rights Commission has dismissed a complaint against authorities’ alleged inaction on human rights violations of workers of a multinational company in Orissa.

”Not entertainable” was how the Commission dubbed the complaint dated September 8, 2010 pertaining to an August 31, 2010 night incident at Vedanta Resources’ aluminium project at Lanjigarh.
The incident involved a hundred-odd policemen swinging batons at thousands of agitated unpaid Vedanta Resources workers, injuring 25 of them and throwing an unspecified number of them in jail.
”The root cause,” the complaint said was ”labour demanding its salary backlog… When workers were denied their arrears, they protested but failed to get their dues and landed in jails… implicated in criminal cases.”
The protest began in the evening after talks on paying minimum wages failed and workers were ”retrenched” instead, Orissa-born complainant Radhakanta Tripathy said.
Police baton-charged protesters ”as some of the workers forcibly entered Vedanta Aluminium’s administrative office and began to destroy property,” the complaint said.
Neither the complaint, nor some media accounts make it clear why Vedanta Resources– committed to investing Rs 36,000 crores to expand the project– allegedly chose to deny workers’ dues.
It is even less clear why the Orissa Labour Department had not intervened at the first sign of trouble.
Efforts to get the status from the Orissa government’s Labour and Employment department commissioner-cum-secretary have yet to bring a reply or an acknowledgement even after three weeks.
The complaint filed before the NHRC did not say how long the workers had remained unpaid, nor the amount the company owed. It simply urged the Commission to institute an investigation.
India has more than a hundred labour laws to ”protect” workmen and workwomen, but enforcement is another matter, subject often to delays and distortion at various levels or stages.
Several laws provide imprisonment for violators, but errant employers usually get away by paying paltry fines or bribing.
Employers seldom– indeed, if ever– do time in jail or pay punitive damages– no matter the laws, no matter the violations, no matter the suffering their victims undergo on account of their actions or inaction.

English: Vedanta Nagar Lanjigarh

Vedanta Nagar Lanjigarh (Photo: Wikipedia)

No matter, indeed, Article 14 of the Constitution Judges are sworn to uphold which provides that ”the State shall not deny to any person equality before the law or the equal protection of the laws within the territory of India.”
Critics say such circumstances may in effect encourage violations by making the breaking of the law a ”profitable” business proposition.
The government has reported that the Britain-based mining conglomerate has been denied permission to expand its Alumina refinery in Lanjigarh for allegedly having flouted norms at its existing works.
The violations reportedly adversely affected the lives of tribals and forest dwellers around Lanjigarh.
The 47-word order cited Section 36 of The Protection of Human Rights Act, 1993 read with regulation 9 of the NHRC (Procedure) Regulations 1994, as amended.”
”Hence, no action is called for and the file is closed,” the order by a Commission assistant registrar (Law) said, without specifying the cause of the disqualification.
Asked why the Commission does not clearly say why a complaint is dismissed, officials acknowledged the need to do so in the interest of transparency but offered no explanation.
Section 36 says the Commission shall neither inquire into any matter pending before a State or other Commission nor into an alleged violation after the expiry of a year.
While the 1993 Act is spelt out on the NHRC website, the 1994 Regulations are not as easily accessible.
Asked to clarify, NHRC joint registrar A K Parashar suggested checking with information officer Jaimini Kumar Srivastava, who cited a Website list of the sort of complaints not entertained:
— Violation committed longer than a year before;
— Matters sub-judice;
— Matters Anonymous or pseudonymous;
— Matters frivolous;
— Service matters.
Asked which of those criteria applied in this case, Commission assistant registrar A K Garg told United News of India special correspondent Mukesh Jhangiani a few days later that ”our policy is not to entertain industrial disputes. That is why the complaint was dismissed.”
UNI MJ SLD 0955