Tag Archive | Radhakanta Tripathy

SC Watchdog Headless – 82 Atrocities Daily – By Mukesh Jhangiani

                                                                                                                                             October 9, 2010

Gandhi collecting funds for harijan work

Gandhi collecting funds for harijan work (Photo: Wikipedia)

SC Watchdog Headless – 82 Atrocities Daily

By Mukesh Jhangiani
United News of India

New Delhi (UNI) – While violations against India’s 180 million scheduled caste citizens have been on the rise, a government agency set up to investigate them has been headless over four months.

Experts say India’s Constitution prescribes a presidential appointment of Chairperson, Vice-Chairperson and three Members of the National Commission for Scheduled Castes but sets no time frame.

The NCSC chairmanship has been vacant since May 25, 2010, the vice-chairmanship and two memberships, since May 28, and another membership since May 29.

In the eyes of law, experts say, such a lapse makes the Commission ”non-functional.”

This is not the first time the posts have remained vacant since the NCSC was carved out of the 28-year-old National Commission for Scheduled Castes and Scheduled Tribes in February 2004.

The NCSC chairmanship was vacant for more than nine months after incumbent Suraj Bhaan died in harness in August 2006. The other four posts, too, remained vacant for three months each.

Sanctioned posts remaining vacant is not unusual in India even in such crucial areas as judiciary, teaching, administration and so on.

Authorities have ignored suggestions about creating a pool of professionals from which candidates may be drawn for appointment without any delay or gap of more than a day or two.

But experts find allowing such vacancies in NCSC hard to explain given the United Progressive Alliance’s avowed commitment to social justice for weaker sections.

The issue has figured in Parliament as well as in the Supreme Court of India.

In Rajya Sabha, Minister of State for Social Justice and Empowerment D Napoleon told Bharatiya Janata Party member from Madhya Pradesh Narayan Singh Kesari that its reconstitution ”is under process.”

That was on August 12, almost three months after vacancies had arisen.

Mr Napolean and MoS for Home Affairs Ajay Maken, in replies to Nationalist Congress Party’s Y P Trivedi from Maharashtra and BJP’s Om Prakash Mathur from Rajasthan, acknowledged a worsening trend.

Mr Maken cited National Crime Records Bureau data that ”a total of 27,070, 30,031 and 33,615 cases of atrocities against Scheduled Castes were registered during 2006-2008 respectively.”

Mr Napolean cited Bureau data that ”the number of registered cases of rape of women belonging to the Scheduled Castes during 2004 to 2008 is” 1157, 1172, 1217, 1349 and 1457, respectively.

On an average, that amounts to an atrocity every 17-18 minutes and a rape every seven hours during the years accounted for– even with a Commission in place.

Data furnished by Mr Maken showed that in 90,716 cases registered, 150,240 persons were chargesheeted, and 43,613 convicted.

But there was no word on the quantum of punishment awarded, if any, that may explain why law or enforcement has failed to produce a deterrent effect.

Last year, a British study suggested that not empowering the NCSCST to enforce its findings has resulted in a failure to punish and deter violations.

The study was sponsored by the Centre for Research on Inequality, Human Security and Ethnicity within Oxford University and supported by the United Kingdom Department for International Development.

The CRISE study pointed to ”the lack of teeth for organisations like” the NCSCST which ”prevented oppressive social practices from being checked and severely punished.”

In July 2010, the apex court was petitioned by a lawyer handling cases of alleged harassment of SC citizens who wanted the government directed to fill the posts as per Article 338 of the Constitution.

In a civil writ petition, advocate Radhakanta Tripathy told the Court he ”has been witnessing the plight” of clients ”since the matters cannot be decided without chairperson and other members.”

He also stressed setting a time frame for future appointments.

At a hearing on August 2, 2010, Justices D K Jain and H L Dattu requested Attorney General G E Vahanvati present in Court ”to seek instructions in the matter.”

Eight weeks later, on September 27, 2010, the Judges disposed of the petition after a government lawyer submitted: ”all appointments in the National Commission for Scheduled Castes shall be made within two months from today.”

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Vedanta Workers’ Wage Struggle ‘Not Entertainable’ : NHRC – By Mukesh Jhangiani

English: NHRC logo

NHRC (Photo: Wikipedia)

                                                                                                           November 21, 2010

Vedanta Workers’ Wage Struggle ‘Not Entertainable’ – NHRC

By Mukesh Jhangiani
United News of India

New Delhi (UNI) – India’s National Human Rights Commission has dismissed a complaint against authorities’ alleged inaction on human rights violations of workers of a multinational company in Orissa.

”Not entertainable” was how the Commission dubbed the complaint dated September 8, 2010 pertaining to an August 31, 2010 night incident at Vedanta Resources’ aluminium project at Lanjigarh.
The incident involved a hundred-odd policemen swinging batons at thousands of agitated unpaid Vedanta Resources workers, injuring 25 of them and throwing an unspecified number of them in jail.
”The root cause,” the complaint said was ”labour demanding its salary backlog… When workers were denied their arrears, they protested but failed to get their dues and landed in jails… implicated in criminal cases.”
The protest began in the evening after talks on paying minimum wages failed and workers were ”retrenched” instead, Orissa-born complainant Radhakanta Tripathy said.
Police baton-charged protesters ”as some of the workers forcibly entered Vedanta Aluminium’s administrative office and began to destroy property,” the complaint said.
Neither the complaint, nor some media accounts make it clear why Vedanta Resources– committed to investing Rs 36,000 crores to expand the project– allegedly chose to deny workers’ dues.
It is even less clear why the Orissa Labour Department had not intervened at the first sign of trouble.
Efforts to get the status from the Orissa government’s Labour and Employment department commissioner-cum-secretary have yet to bring a reply or an acknowledgement even after three weeks.
The complaint filed before the NHRC did not say how long the workers had remained unpaid, nor the amount the company owed. It simply urged the Commission to institute an investigation.
India has more than a hundred labour laws to ”protect” workmen and workwomen, but enforcement is another matter, subject often to delays and distortion at various levels or stages.
Several laws provide imprisonment for violators, but errant employers usually get away by paying paltry fines or bribing.
Employers seldom– indeed, if ever– do time in jail or pay punitive damages– no matter the laws, no matter the violations, no matter the suffering their victims undergo on account of their actions or inaction.

English: Vedanta Nagar Lanjigarh

Vedanta Nagar Lanjigarh (Photo: Wikipedia)

No matter, indeed, Article 14 of the Constitution Judges are sworn to uphold which provides that ”the State shall not deny to any person equality before the law or the equal protection of the laws within the territory of India.”
Critics say such circumstances may in effect encourage violations by making the breaking of the law a ”profitable” business proposition.
The government has reported that the Britain-based mining conglomerate has been denied permission to expand its Alumina refinery in Lanjigarh for allegedly having flouted norms at its existing works.
The violations reportedly adversely affected the lives of tribals and forest dwellers around Lanjigarh.
The 47-word order cited Section 36 of The Protection of Human Rights Act, 1993 read with regulation 9 of the NHRC (Procedure) Regulations 1994, as amended.”
”Hence, no action is called for and the file is closed,” the order by a Commission assistant registrar (Law) said, without specifying the cause of the disqualification.
Asked why the Commission does not clearly say why a complaint is dismissed, officials acknowledged the need to do so in the interest of transparency but offered no explanation.
Section 36 says the Commission shall neither inquire into any matter pending before a State or other Commission nor into an alleged violation after the expiry of a year.
While the 1993 Act is spelt out on the NHRC website, the 1994 Regulations are not as easily accessible.
Asked to clarify, NHRC joint registrar A K Parashar suggested checking with information officer Jaimini Kumar Srivastava, who cited a Website list of the sort of complaints not entertained:
— Violation committed longer than a year before;
— Matters sub-judice;
— Matters Anonymous or pseudonymous;
— Matters frivolous;
— Service matters.
Asked which of those criteria applied in this case, Commission assistant registrar A K Garg told United News of India special correspondent Mukesh Jhangiani a few days later that ”our policy is not to entertain industrial disputes. That is why the complaint was dismissed.”
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